skunkbear:

Beautiful reconstructed hominin skulls — the early members of humanity’s family tree! You can see lots more on the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Flickr page.

(via veganprimatologist)

stagspirit:

Deer pelvis by Katerina Koza.
This was a gift from Leah. <3

stagspirit:

Deer pelvis by Katerina Koza.

This was a gift from Leah. <3

(via oosik)

newmiu:

useless-worthless-nobody:

intoxifaded:

Save this to your phones or computer and post it on other websites like twitter too!

Why would you NOT reblog this?

so impt

newmiu:

useless-worthless-nobody:

intoxifaded:

Save this to your phones or computer and post it on other websites like twitter too!

Why would you NOT reblog this?

so impt

(via aristocleia)

marine-science:

Methods of coral restoration are being applied in many parts of the world, including Florida, Mozambique and the Caribbean islands. Fast growing, branching species are being reared by conservationists and scientists and used for “reef seeding” projects. 

"It sounds quite novel, but in fact its a science thats been around for about 30 years. One of the reasons why I’m drawn to it is because its a very active way to get people physically involved in protecting the ocean."

Photo credits: top, middle, second from bottom, bottom

(via aristocleia)

thatdayinhistory:

softlatingrunge:

prince-drawlestia:

pizzaismylifepizzaisking:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

Wait a minute…i was reading ultrafacts  &amp;realized that THIS GUY WAS THE SAME GUY WHO DID THIS

(Source)
&amp;

(Source)
I think he was crazy

Welcome to Emperor Caligula

Caligula also forcibly disemboweled his wife! C: or was it his sister? …but yes, he was insane.

Caligula was insane.

thatdayinhistory:

softlatingrunge:

prince-drawlestia:

pizzaismylifepizzaisking:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

Wait a minute…i was reading ultrafacts  &realized that THIS GUY WAS THE SAME GUY WHO DID THIS

(Source)

&

(Source)

I think he was crazy

Welcome to Emperor Caligula

Caligula also forcibly disemboweled his wife! C: or was it his sister? …but yes, he was insane.

Caligula was insane.

(via aristocleia)

whenindoubtapplymoreglitter:

impostoradult:

pacerlabs:

This is actually a really, really well done article. long but absolutely worth the read. So glad that a magazine as big as Rolling Stone is publishing content saying, “Hey, people, we may be patting ourselves on the back about marriage equality these days but there are much bigger issues still being swept under the rug.”

This is one of the sad ironies about increased visibility and decreasing homophobia within the general public. In this era, more and more people come out earlier and earlier because there is a lot more supportive space within our broader society in which to do so. But of course there are many individuals and communities within our larger society that are still VERY homophobic, which makes that impulse to come out still quite dangerous for some. 

In the past, rarely did children ever voluntarily come out to their parents, particularly while they were still living with them. Often if they were ‘outed’ it was not by their own choice or design. Now, coming out is what you are ‘supposed’ to do. And for young people who have relatively supportive families, i imagine that earlier disclosure is a relief. But for those for whom acute homophobia is still a part of their immediate circumstance, this new norm of voluntarily coming out as an adolescent or teenager has become very, very perilous. 

We’re living in an era of profound transition, and the resulting uneveness of societal homophobia created by this transitional stage is producing outcomes like this, where decreasing collective homophobia results in increasing manifestations of it in some quarters. It’s very ironic and unfortunate. And it should be something we care more about than we do. 

reblogging for bold (and rest of the commentary)

(via aristocleia)

rhamphotheca:

What an amazing find! 
A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.
You can read more about this exceptional story here:
Turtle Survival Alliance

rhamphotheca:

What an amazing find!

A female Sundarbans River Terrapin (Batagur baska) was discovered in a family pond in Bangladesh. The turtle had been kept as a pet for 16 years. After much discussion, the turtle’s owner agreed to sell the critically endangered turtle to the team’s breeding colony, adding a seventh female and diversifying the genetic base! In this touching photo, the previous owner says good-bye to her beloved pet.

You can read more about this exceptional story here:

Turtle Survival Alliance

(via aristocleia)

I know that this blog of mine isn’t active very often at all, but I’ve really been slacking on it lately. Sorry about all that, guys! I really appreciate those that have stuck around through my horridly intermittent blogging! 

We’re getting into midterms and papers now, so I at least have an excuse for my absence. I’ll try to up my posting game soon! 

Next semester I’m putting my double major on paper, and I can’t wait! I hope all of your studies and lives are going well 

smithsonian:

The Life Aquatic…Birds: When an exhibition at our Natural History Museum (Hall of Bones) looks like a Wes Anderson movie. 

smithsonian:

The Life Aquatic…Birds: When an exhibition at our Natural History Museum (Hall of Bones) looks like a Wes Anderson movie. 

sixpenceee:

A graduate student has created the first man-made biological leaf. It absorbs water and carbon dioxide to produce oxygen just like a plant. He did this by suspending chloroplasts in a mixture made out of silk protein. He believed it can be used for many things but the most striking one is the thought that it could be used for long distance space travel. Plants do not grow in space, but this synthetic material can be used to produce oxygen in a hostile environment. (Video)

(via anthrocentric)

thejunglenook:

Look at the awesome (early) birthday present arrowsforpens got me!! Primatology art is a beautiful thing.

thejunglenook:

Look at the awesome (early) birthday present arrowsforpens got me!!
Primatology art is a beautiful thing.

(Source: buy-skulls, via oosik)

theolduvaigorge:

Museum für Völkerkunde zu Leipzig, Part I 2014

I took a few photos during summer and I shall share them over the next few weeks.  I don’t often take photos but I had a lot of time on my hands…

archaeologicalnews:

image

Hammershus, perched on the cliffs of northwest Bornholm in the Baltic, is perhaps Denmark’s best known ruin. It was excavated and renovated at the end of the 1800s up until 1940, but the ruined castle is still shrouded in a mystery with significance to the history of Denmark: who actually…

nok-ind:

Africa’s Oldest Known Boat
8000 years ago, in the region now known as Nigeria. ”Africa’s oldest known boat” the Dufuna Canoe was discovered near the region of the River Yobe. The Canoe was discovered by a Fulani herdsman in May 1987, in Dufuna Village while digging a well. The canoe’s “almost black wood”, said to be African mahogany, as “entirely an organic material”. Various Radio-Carbon tests conducted in laboratories of reputable Universities in Europe and America indicate that the Canoe is over 8000 years old, thus making it the oldest in Africa and 3rd oldest in the World. Little is known of the period to which the boat belongs, in archaeological terms it is described as an early phase of the Later Stone Age, which began rather more than 12,000 years ago and ended with the appearance of pottery. 

The lab results redefined the pre-history of African water transport, ranking the Dufuna canoe as the world’s third oldest known dugout. Older than it are the dugouts from Pesse, Netherlands, and Noyen-sur-Seine, France. But evidence of an 8,000-year-old tradition of boat building in Africa throws cold water on the assumption that maritime transport developed much later there in comparison with Europe. Peter Breunig of the University of Frankfurt, Germany, an archaeologist involved in the project, says the canoe’s age “forces a reconsideration of Africa’s role in the history of water transport”. It shows, he adds, “that the cultural history of Africa was not determined by Near Eastern and European influences but took its own, in many cases parallel, course”. Breunig, adding that it even outranks in style European finds of similar age. According to him, “The bow and stern are both carefully worked to points, giving the boat a notably more elegant form”, compared to “the dugout made of conifer wood from Pesse in the Netherlands, whose blunt ends and thick sides seem crude”. To go by its stylistic sophistication, he reasons, “It is highly probable that the Dufuna boat does not represent the beginning of a tradition, but had already undergone a long development, and that the origins of water transport in Africa lie even further back in time.”

Egypt’s oldest known boat is 5000 years old.

P. Breunig, The 8000-year-old dugout canoe from Dufuna (NE Nigeria), G. Pwiti and R. Soper (eds.), Aspects of African Archaeology. Papers from the 10th Congress of the PanAfrican Association for Prehistory and related Studies. University of Zimbabwe Publications (Harare 1996) 461-468.
ISBN: 0908307551

nok-ind:

Africa’s Oldest Known Boat
8000 years ago, in the region now known as Nigeria. ”Africa’s oldest known boat” the Dufuna Canoe was discovered near the region of the River Yobe. The Canoe was discovered by a Fulani herdsman in May 1987, in Dufuna Village while digging a well. The canoe’s “almost black wood”, said to be African mahogany, as “entirely an organic material”. Various Radio-Carbon tests conducted in laboratories of reputable Universities in Europe and America indicate that the Canoe is over 8000 years old, thus making it the oldest in Africa and 3rd oldest in the World. Little is known of the period to which the boat belongs, in archaeological terms it is described as an early phase of the Later Stone Age, which began rather more than 12,000 years ago and ended with the appearance of pottery. 
The lab results redefined the pre-history of African water transport, ranking the Dufuna canoe as the world’s third oldest known dugout. Older than it are the dugouts from Pesse, Netherlands, and Noyen-sur-Seine, France. But evidence of an 8,000-year-old tradition of boat building in Africa throws cold water on the assumption that maritime transport developed much later there in comparison with Europe. Peter Breunig of the University of Frankfurt, Germany, an archaeologist involved in the project, says the canoe’s age “forces a reconsideration of Africa’s role in the history of water transport”. It shows, he adds, “that the cultural history of Africa was not determined by Near Eastern and European influences but took its own, in many cases parallel, course”. Breunig, adding that it even outranks in style European finds of similar age. According to him, “The bow and stern are both carefully worked to points, giving the boat a notably more elegant form”, compared to “the dugout made of conifer wood from Pesse in the Netherlands, whose blunt ends and thick sides seem crude”. To go by its stylistic sophistication, he reasons, “It is highly probable that the Dufuna boat does not represent the beginning of a tradition, but had already undergone a long development, and that the origins of water transport in Africa lie even further back in time.”
Egypt’s oldest known boat is 5000 years old.
P. Breunig, The 8000-year-old dugout canoe from Dufuna (NE Nigeria), G. Pwiti and R. Soper (eds.), Aspects of African Archaeology. Papers from the 10th Congress of the PanAfrican Association for Prehistory and related Studies. University of Zimbabwe Publications (Harare 1996) 461-468.
ISBN: 0908307551

(via anthrocentric)