nok-ind:

Africa’s Oldest Known Boat
8000 years ago, in the region now known as Nigeria. ”Africa’s oldest known boat” the Dufuna Canoe was discovered near the region of the River Yobe. The Canoe was discovered by a Fulani herdsman in May 1987, in Dufuna Village while digging a well. The canoe’s “almost black wood”, said to be African mahogany, as “entirely an organic material”. Various Radio-Carbon tests conducted in laboratories of reputable Universities in Europe and America indicate that the Canoe is over 8000 years old, thus making it the oldest in Africa and 3rd oldest in the World. Little is known of the period to which the boat belongs, in archaeological terms it is described as an early phase of the Later Stone Age, which began rather more than 12,000 years ago and ended with the appearance of pottery. 
The lab results redefined the pre-history of African water transport, ranking the Dufuna canoe as the world’s third oldest known dugout. Older than it are the dugouts from Pesse, Netherlands, and Noyen-sur-Seine, France. But evidence of an 8,000-year-old tradition of boat building in Africa throws cold water on the assumption that maritime transport developed much later there in comparison with Europe. Peter Breunig of the University of Frankfurt, Germany, an archaeologist involved in the project, says the canoe’s age “forces a reconsideration of Africa’s role in the history of water transport”. It shows, he adds, “that the cultural history of Africa was not determined by Near Eastern and European influences but took its own, in many cases parallel, course”. Breunig, adding that it even outranks in style European finds of similar age. According to him, “The bow and stern are both carefully worked to points, giving the boat a notably more elegant form”, compared to “the dugout made of conifer wood from Pesse in the Netherlands, whose blunt ends and thick sides seem crude”. To go by its stylistic sophistication, he reasons, “It is highly probable that the Dufuna boat does not represent the beginning of a tradition, but had already undergone a long development, and that the origins of water transport in Africa lie even further back in time.”
Egypt’s oldest known boat is 5000 years old.
P. Breunig, The 8000-year-old dugout canoe from Dufuna (NE Nigeria), G. Pwiti and R. Soper (eds.), Aspects of African Archaeology. Papers from the 10th Congress of the PanAfrican Association for Prehistory and related Studies. University of Zimbabwe Publications (Harare 1996) 461-468.
ISBN: 0908307551

(via anthrocentric)

scienceyoucanlove:

Poachers turn gamekeeper to guard Rwandan gorillasRead more: http://news.yahoo.com/poachers-turn-gamekeeper-guard-rwandan-gorillas-035341769.html
through 
Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP) scienceyoucanlove:

Poachers turn gamekeeper to guard Rwandan gorillasRead more: http://news.yahoo.com/poachers-turn-gamekeeper-guard-rwandan-gorillas-035341769.html
through 
Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP) scienceyoucanlove:

Poachers turn gamekeeper to guard Rwandan gorillasRead more: http://news.yahoo.com/poachers-turn-gamekeeper-guard-rwandan-gorillas-035341769.html
through 
Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP) scienceyoucanlove:

Poachers turn gamekeeper to guard Rwandan gorillasRead more: http://news.yahoo.com/poachers-turn-gamekeeper-guard-rwandan-gorillas-035341769.html
through 
Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP-UNEP)

? Saturday Questions?

thejunglenook:

Q: What primate has the color caboose pictured below?
Bonus: Can you name this primate’s even more colorful cousin?

oosik:

hippiewithchivalry:

model of drop and toss zones, as developed by L. R. Binford

A mentor and good friend of mine, who is actually responsible for getting me into Alaskan archaeology, Katie Krasinski, applied this theory to the Broken Mammoth site - where I did my field school.

(via valdanderthal)

beetonic:

Guess where I went today
beetonic:

Guess where I went today
beetonic:

Guess where I went today
beetonic:

Guess where I went today
beetonic:

Guess where I went today
beetonic:

Guess where I went today
beetonic:

Guess where I went today
beetonic:

Guess where I went today

beetonic:

Guess where I went today

(via valdanderthal)

Q

Anonymous asked:

Did you know that studies have shown that men are better science researchers than women?

A

reallymadscientist:

imageDid you know that I don’t believe people’s stupid ass claims when they don’t cite their sources? 

eternalacademic:

I hate this strategy. It 1) Implies being a man is best and 2) Implies that you need to change in order to be valued. 

^

oosik:

archaeoillustration:

Not illustration but very interesting regarding the number of stone tool illustrations we have been posting lately

Flint Knapping - Will Lord shows how to make a Flint Hand Axe

I’ve never actually seen a small hammer be used like that before in knapping, but he might be on to something - getting over the platform like that, being able to see where the strike is going. I think his hammerstone in the beginning is a bit small, he has some troubles with it, but makes it work.

This is so freaking cool sign me up

(via theolduvaigorge)

sweetteascience:

charlielasirene:

life #literacy 

I absolutely love this image.  I think it’s very pertinent to scientific literacy as well!

(via eternalacademic)

think-progress:

But the wage gap varies significantly by race, according to an analysis from the research organization AAUW. While white women experienced that 78 percent figure, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander women made 65 percent of what white men made in 2013, African-American women made 64 percent, American Indian and Alaska Native women made 59 percent, and Hispanic women made just 54 percent. Asian-American women are the only group doing better than white women, making 90 percent of white men’s earnings.

Woah, staggering.

(via science-and-things)